Lenten Devotion 15 3.13.2020

Micah 4: 1-5
 
1In days to come
the mountain of the LORD’s house
shall be established as the highest of the mountains,
and shall be raised up above the hills.
Peoples shall stream to it,
2 and many nations shall come and say:
‘Come, let us go up to the mountain of the LORD,
to the house of the God of Jacob;
that he may teach us his ways
and that we may walk in his paths.’
For out of Zion shall go forth instruction,
and the word of the LORD from Jerusalem.
3 He shall judge between many peoples,
and shall arbitrate between strong nations far away;
they shall beat their swords into ploughshares,
and their spears into pruning-hooks;
nation shall not lift up sword against nation,
neither shall they learn war any more;
4 but they shall all sit under their own vines and under their own fig trees,
and no one shall make them afraid;
for the mouth of the LORD of hosts has spoken.
5 For all the peoples walk,
each in the name of its god,
but we will walk in the name of the LORD our God
for ever and ever.
 
Who was Micah?
 
Micah was a prophetic preacher in Judah. He was a younger contemporary of Isaiah. At the time of Micah’s ministry, the world was not a peaceful one. The Assyrians were constantly rattling their sabers on the northern border of Israel. Other prophets (Hosea and Amos in Israel and Isaiah in Judah) were warning that the Assyrians would conquer both countries as a tool of God’s judgment for their apostacy. Micah was preaching that Jerusalem would be reduced to rubble and its people taken to Babylon. That ultimately happened, though not in Micah’s lifetime.
Did Micah offer hope?
 
Micah preached that after the destruction, God would bring forth a king from the line of David to rule over God’s people. That would lead to a world described in our text.
 
Jerusalem would rise from the rubble and become the highest mountain on earth. I would become the central place of all people. The Lord would rule with justice. All the nations would come to the mountain to learn God’s ways. Everyone would sit under their vines without fear of invasion and there would be agricultural plenty. How could this happen? The weapons of war become agricultural tools.
 
Does Micah say anything to us, today?
 
Looking at Micah’s message in today’s test, we are reminded of Jesus’ message that the Kingdom of God is a place where there is no war. It is like a return to Eden. A place Jesus called paradise. Are we there yet? No, we are not. But that is the promise Jesus gave us in the new covenant. Look to Jesus to learn how we are to live. Live the Jesus way.

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