This Week at JMPC 9.30.18

This is from an article by Tim Kreider called The Busy Trap , published in The New York Times (6-30-12):
 
If you live in America in the 21st century, you’ve probably had to listen to a lot of people tell you how busy they are. It’s become the default response when you ask anyone how they’re doing: “Busy!” “So busy.” “Crazy busy.” It is, pretty obviously, a boast disguised as a complaint. And the stock response is a kind of congratulation: “That’s a good problem to have,” or “Better than the opposite.” Have you heard such things? Said such things? Are these good things? What about rest? What about relaxation? What about giving ourselves a break? We are not so good at that as a culture. Even on our off days, we fill our schedule with things to do. Activities take the place of rest and are a poor excuse for it, because it does not reboot or refresh us the way down time does. Down time is not something I am very good at. When I was suffering from patellar tendinitis last year, my knees hurt all the time. It was making my daily workouts hard and painful. I went to a couple doctors and a couple physical therapists with one thing in mind. Fix this. And when I heard their collective prescription, I did not like it. RICE: Rest, ice, compression and elevation. In other words, take some time off at the gym. Grrrrrr. So, rest is the antidote when we are injured, sick, stressed, right? Rest. Take a day off. Give yourself a break. What is interesting, though, is that rest is also a preventive measure. If you incorporate a rest day into your week, and actually rest on that day, your body and mind will be strengthened and become more resistant to the stresses of life. Maybe that is why God gave us the 4th Commandment. Come and hear about it on Sunday September 30th at 8:30 and 11 at John McMillan Presbyterian Church when Pastor Jeff preaches “A Mental Health Day” based on Exodus 20: 1; 8-11. Come and give yourself a break.

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